Three Ways Rising House Prices Could Impact You

According to the National Association of Realtors, median home prices across the US have increased by more than 7% year-over-year.  This means you’d pay approx. $374,000 in today’s market for a house you could have purchased a year ago for $349,000.  Here are three ways this could impact you:

1 – If You’re Thinking of Selling a Home
You may benefit by selling your home now instead of waiting. The new home you’d purchase to replace your current home is likely to cost you more if you wait a year.  Not only that, but your monthly payments could also increase if interest rates continue to climb.

2 – If You’re Thinking of Buying a Home
For the same reasons stated above, it’s probably a good idea for you to consider buying now instead of waiting.  If home prices continue to increase, you’d benefit from the increase instead of being stuck on the other side of the decision wishing you could have purchased a home at last year’s prices.

3 – If You’re Thinking of Making Home Improvements
If your home has increased in value, you may be able to tap into the additional equity to finance your home improvement project.

Contact me for more info or to explore your options!

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How Much Do You Need to Make to Buy a Home in Your State?

How Much Do You Need to Make to Buy a Home in Your State? | MyKCM

It’s no mystery that cost of living varies drastically depending on where you live, so a new study by GOBankingRates set out to find out what minimum salary you would need to make in order to buy a median-priced home in each of the 50 states, and Washington, D.C.

States in the Midwest came out on top as most affordable, requiring the smallest salaries in order to buy a median-priced home. States with large metropolitan areas saw a bump in the average salary needed to buy with California, Washington, D.C., and Hawaii edging out all others with the highest salaries required.

Below is a map with the full results of the study:

How Much Do You Need to Make to Buy a Home in Your State? | MyKCM

GoBankingRates gave this advice to anyone considering a home purchase,

“Before you buy a home, it’s important to find out if you can afford the monthly mortgage payment. To do this, some financial experts recommend your housing costs — primarily your mortgage payments — shouldn’t consume more than 30 percent of your monthly income.”

As we recently reported, research from Zillow shows that historically, Americans had spent 21% of their income on owning a median-priced home. The latest data from the fourth quarter of 2017 shows that the percentage of income needed today is only 15.7%!

Bottom Line

If you are considering buying a home, whether it’s your first time or your fifth time, let’s get together to evaluate your ability to do so in today’s market!

Rising Prices Help You Build Your Family’s Wealth

Over the next five years, home prices are expected to appreciate, on average, by 3.6% per year and to grow by 18.2% cumulatively, according to Pulsenomics’ most recent Home Price Expectation Survey.

So, what does this mean for homeowners and their equity position?

As an example, let’s assume a young couple purchased and closed on a $250,000 home this January. If we only look at the projected increase in the price of that home, how much equity will they earn over the next 5 years?

Rising Prices Help You Build Your Family’s Wealth | MyKCM

Since the experts predict that home prices will increase by 5.0% in 2018, the young homeowners will have gained $12,500 in equity in just one year.

Over a five-year period, their equity will increase by over $48,000! This figure does not even take into account their monthly principal mortgage payments. In many cases, home equity is one of the largest portions of a family’s overall net worth.

Bottom Line

Not only is homeownership something to be proud of, but it also offers you and your family the ability to build equity you can borrow against in the future. If you are ready and willing to buy, find out if you are able to today!

Top 4 Home Renovations for Maximum

Top 4 Home Renovations for Maximum ROI [INFOGRAPHIC] | MyKCM

Some Highlights:

  • Whether you are selling your home, just purchased your first home, or are a homeowner planning to stay put for a while, there is value in knowing which home improvement projects will net you the most “Return On Investment” (ROI).
  • While big projects like adding a bathroom or a complete remodel of a kitchen are popular ways to increase a home’s value, something as simple as updating landscaping and curb appeal can have a quick impact on a home’s value.

House Prices: Simply a Matter of Supply & Demand

House Prices: Simply a Matter of Supply & Demand | MyKCM

Why are home prices still rising? It is a simple answer. There are more purchasers in the market right now than there are available homes for them to buy. This is an example of the theory of “supply and demand” which is defined as:

“the amount of a commodity, product, or service available and the desire of buyers for it, considered as factors regulating its price.”

When demand exceeds supply, prices go up. This is currently happening in the residential real estate market.

Here are the numbers for supply and demand as compared to last year for the last three months (March numbers are not yet available):

House Prices: Simply a Matter of Supply & Demand | MyKCM

In each of the last three months, demand (buyer traffic) has increased as compared to last year while supply (number of available listings) has decreased. If this situation persists, home values will continue to increase.

Bottom Line

The reason home prices are still rising is because there are many purchasers looking to buy, but very few homeowners ready to sell. This imbalance is the reason prices will remain on the uptick.

Three Questions to Ask Before You Invest in Real Estate

It’s important to ask these three questions when you invest in real estate:

  1. How can I increase my rate of return?  The cornerstone of any smart investment strategy is to calculate your rate of return.  With real estate this is done by running the numbers using an internal rate of return (IRR) formula that takes into account:
    • Present Value (PV) – what am I paying out of pocket to get into this investment?
    • Term (N) – what’s my timeline and how long am I going to hold this investment?
    • Periodic Cash Flow (PMT) – what’s my monthly cash flow?
    • Future Value (FV) – what are my net proceeds (after expenses) when I sell the investment?
  2. How does my rate of return with real estate compare with other investment opportunities?  When calculating your rate of return, make sure to account for:
    • Carrying costs (mortgage, taxes, insurance, maintenance, etc.)
    • Your time spent managing the property
    • Vacancy loss if you don’t find a tenant
  3. How can I reduce my risk?  You may want to consider these strategies to reduce your investment risk:
    • Increase your liability insurance in case something goes wrong
    • Consider a rent-to-own strategy where you find a tenant before you find a property
    • Consider mortgage strategies that result in more cash flow and/or better liquidity

Contact me so we can get started on helping you answer these questions!

Housing Prices are NOT Heading for Another Crash

As home values continue to increase at levels greater than historic norms, some are concerned that we are heading for another crash like the one we experienced ten years ago. We recently explained that the lenient lending standards of the previous decade (which created false demand) no longer exist. But what about prices?

Are prices appreciating at the same rate that they were prior to the crash of 2006-2008? Let’s look at the numbers as reported by Freddie Mac:

Housing Prices are NOT Heading for Another Crash | MyKCM

The levels of appreciation we have experienced over the last four years aren’t anywhere near the levels that were reached in the four years prior to last decade’s crash.

We must also realize that, to a degree, the current run-up in prices is the market trying to catch up after a crash that dramatically dropped prices for five years.

Bottom Line

Prices are appreciating at levels greater than historic norms. However, we are not at the levels that led to the housing bubble and bust.