THREE THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT “TRENDED CREDIT DATA”

Three credit cards piled on top of dollar bills

1 – What is it?
“Trended credit data” is an analytical tool that helps lenders better evaluate your spending habits.  It’s a detailed analysis of the last 24 months of your credit history, including:

  • Month-by-month balances on your credit cards and other debts; and,
  • The difference between your scheduled minimum payment and your actual payment amount.

2 – Why does it matter?
Mortgage lenders are now required to use “trended credit data” when they evaluate your loan application.  This helps them to spot trends including:

  • Do you typically max out your credit cards; and if so, which ones?
  • Do you typically you pay off your credit card balances each month?
  • Do you intend to carry a balance from month-to-month while making minimum or other payments?

3 – How does it impact you?
Trended credit data does not impact your credit score. It simply gives the lender a more thorough analysis of your balance and payment history over the past 24 months. For example, if you typically pay off your balances in full, this may positively impact your loan application.  On the other hand, if you typically max out your credit cards and make only the minimum payments, this may negatively impact your loan application.

You can always request a copy of your credit report from your mortgage lender, and it will now include your trended credit data.  If you notice any errors, feel free to dispute the errors with the credit bureaus using their standard dispute procedures.  Please contact me if you have any questions or for further information.

No Housing Bubble – No 2005 again!

4 Stats That PROVE This Is NOT 2005 All over Again | MyKCM

Recent research by the National Association of Realtors (NAR) examined certain red flags that caused the housing crisis in 2005, and then compared them to today’s real estate market. Today, we want to concentrate on four of those red flags.

  1. Price to Rent Ratio
  2. Price to Income Ratio
  3. Mortgage Transactions
  4. House Flipping

All four categories were outside historical norms in 2005. Home prices were way above normal ratios when compared to both rents and incomes at the time.

NAR explained that mortgage transactions as a percentage of all home sales were also at a higher percentage:

“Loose credit was one of the main culprits of the housing crisis. Mortgage lending expanded dramatically as unhealthy housing speculation reached its peak and was met by the highest level of credit availability as measured by the Mortgage Bankers Association. The index measures the overall mortgage credit condition by the share of home sales financed by mortgages. This metric does not capture credit quality, but it does set a view of the importance of financing in supporting the housing market.”

House flipping was rampant in 2005. As NAR’s research points out:

“Heightened flipping activity is a clear indication of speculation in the real estate market. A property is considered as a speculative flip if the property is sold twice within 12 months and with positive profit. Flipping is a normal part of a healthy housing market. In an inflated housing market, expectations about short-term profit from pure price appreciation are very high; therefore, the level of flipping activity would show evidence of being heightened.”

Here are the categories with percentages reflecting the unrealistic ratios & numbers of 2005 as compared to the current market. Remember, a negative percentage reflects a positive gain for the market.

4 Stats That PROVE This Is NOT 2005 All over Again | MyKCM

Bottom Line

They say hindsight is 20/20… Today, experts are keeping a close watch on the potential red flags that went unnoticed in 2005.

Lastly, keep in mind lending is not the same today as back then and so this further insulates us from the same thing happening again.  Although, we are now seeing more Non QM lenders coming back into the market and presenting loan solutions for those who are not able to obtain A paper loans.  Time will tell and need to be consistent with responsible lending.

How Do Rising Prices Impact Your Home Equity?

How Do Rising Prices Impact Your Home Equity? | MyKCM

Yesterday, we shared the results of the latest Home Price Expectation Survey by Pulsenomics. One of the big takeaways from the survey is that over the next five years, home prices will appreciate 3.5% per year on average, and cumulatively will grow by around 18%.

So what does this mean for homeowners and their equity position?

For example, let’s assume a young couple purchased and closed on a $250,000 home in January of this year. If we only look at the projected increase in the price of that home, how much equity would they earn over the next 5 years?

How Do Rising Prices Impact Your Home Equity? | MyKCM

Since the experts predict that home prices will increase by 4.5% this year alone, the young homeowners will have gained over $11,000 in equity in just one year.

Over a five-year period, their equity will increase by over $46,000! This figure does not even take into account their monthly principal mortgage payments. In many cases, home equity is one of the largest portions of a family’s overall net worth.

Bottom Line

Not only is home ownership something to be proud of, it also offers you and your family the ability to build equity you can borrow against in the future. If you are ready and willing to buy, let’s meet up to find out if you are able to today!

New Construction Numbers Today vs 2005

New Construction Numbers: Now Versus 2005 | MyKCM

There is some thinking that the pace of the housing recovery is unsustainable and that we may be heading for another housing bubble. However, Jonathan Smoke, the Chief Economist of realtor.com explains the basic difference between 2005 and today:

“The havoc during the last cycle was the result of building too many homes and of speculation fueled by loose credit. That’s the exact opposite of what we have today.”

If we look at the number of new single family housing starts over the last 30 years, we can see that the numbers of housing starts during the current recovery (2012-Today) are still way below historic averages, and are far less than the numbers built during the run-up to the housing bubble (2002-2006).

New Construction Numbers: Now Versus 2005 | MyKCM

A single family housing start is defined as “the number of permits issued for construction of new single family housing units. Housing starts are an important economic indicator due to its extensive spill over benefits for the other sectors of the economy (retail, manufacturing, utilities).”

Bottom Line

Current demand for housing actually calls for more new construction to be built – not less. We should at least return to historically normal inventory levels.